Australian Marriage Equality: Why I cried today, and then cried some more.

The Australian parliament passed marriage equality into law today. As I walked to work on a cold, grey morning in Manchester, UK, I cried. I’ve shed the odd tear in public many times before imagining this day. But today I cried, and I cried, and then I cried some more. I sobbed in my office until I was physically exhausted.

I cried because I and everybody else in my country who has lived a life of being ‘different’, ‘less’ or ‘not worthy’ due to no choice of our own, purely for who we might love, are now, by law, the same, equal, and as worthy as anybody else to marry who we choose.

I cried because the years I have struggled and campaigned for this, the years my friends have struggled and campaigned for this, and the many years before us that many others have fought for this equality, many without seeing the reward, have not been for nothing.

I cried because of the efforts of so many around the country to make this happen. I cried for the little boy in Sydney who wanted to use a sky-writer to tell people to vote yes, and I cried for the teenager in Bega who distributed rainbow socks to anybody he could get to wear them in support – both far too young to actually vote themselves.

I cried for the children and teens now and in the future, queer or otherwise, who won’t grow up in the Australian society I did.

I cried because all those people who called me names, spat at me, threatened me, excluded me, and even probably hated me, just because of my perceived sexuality, cannot put me down anymore; I am now part of the majority.

I cried because that crazy bitch who lived next door to me and who, when as a teenager my soccer ball hit the fence, screeched at me “poofter” and “faggot”, her words cutting me like knives as I ran and hid in my bedroom, can go give birth to a chair and sit on it as I marry a man in the garden in front of her. I may be a poofter or I may not be; whatever I am, I am proud of it, and I will not hide anymore.

I cried because I am happy. I cried because I am proud.

I cried because I am relieved, and so, so exhausted.

I cried because some people still said no.

I cried because everything still hurts.

I cried because many of the people who I love and care about so much will never fully understand how this feels, nor can they fully understand how I have felt all these years. Today we can celebrate together, but it doesn’t erase how lonely I have been, not yet at least.

I cried because I. Am. Okay.

I cried because things will be better.

I cried because, at least for a moment in this crazy and often hurtful world, love wins.

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2 thoughts on “Australian Marriage Equality: Why I cried today, and then cried some more.

  1. Thank you so much for this post, Billy – it made me cry (again). I can now marry my partner of over 20 years. As lifelong feminists, we haven’t been big fans of marriage as an institution, yet I have been surprised by how emotional we have become at each step in this process. Whether we choose to get married or not, now we have the choice. And that has huge symbolic value.
    All the best
    Sandra

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Sandra.
      I’ve always been pretty opposed to marriage itself too (a woman in purity white is given away from one man to another man to obey them???), well the religious institution version at least. I wouldn’t mind if the country didn’t have marriage at all, as long as everyone is equal and has the same choices available to them. This is about so much more than marriage, and a law won’t change it all, but it is a start. Thanks for your comment – it’s comforting to hear other’s stories too. And all the best to you and your partner, whatever you decide to do.

      Like

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